Wednesday, April 22, 2015

The Broken Globe Book Review

Synopsis:
Liana Tyr is a master swordswoman, but, because of her sex, has not yet seen a single battle. Varian Tyr is expected to be the next Duke of Dereven, but is outshone by his twin sister in combat, and unsure of himself in affairs of state. Sylvan, the youngest Tyr, has studied magic for most of his life, but feels constrained by the rules placed upon him, whether from his tutor, or from the gods themselves. 

After the abrupt death of their father, the three Tyr siblings must venture forth into the wide world of Telkorria in search of The Broken Globe, a legendary artifact that prophecy foretells will either save the world or destroy it. But along their journey, as they deal with loss, doubt, abandoned responsibility, and even attacks on their sanity, they begin to realize they may not be up to the task. 

What makes a fantasy? Is it the magical creatures and places, the history and lore, the sense of wonder? Can fantasy be more than that? As the Tyrs struggle to cope with the impossible task before them, the walls of their world begin to break down, and they begin to question everything they ever knew.

Purchase: Amazon 

My Review: 
I received a free copy of this novel in exchange for my honest review.

Varian, his twin sister Liana, and younger brother Sylvan are on a quest to fulfill a prophecy from The Book of Truth. Unfortunately, the twins haven't read or been told about the great book since they were young children and Sylvan never has.  But their father has been murdered by a demon, and now they must find the broken globe and put it back together.  There quest spans into vast continents, putting in them through a perilous journey and forging unlikely alliances.


I have to admit I was a little disturbed by this book.  Don't get me wrong, it starts really good and I had very high hopes.  But once the siblings begin their quest, the story began to stray and I was left wondering why, for example, we needed to know of Liana's menstrual cycle.  I was also thrown by Varian's sex scene when he's orientation up until this point wasn't completely confirmed.  I was a bit bothered by that and for nobles, these people swore like sailors.  That doesn't seem to make any sense to me at all.  I really hope that book two makes up for all that book one is lacking because it has the potential to be a really great series.

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